The Washington Post’s ABC Afterschool Special Logic.

Once upon a time, when I was a kid, they made us watching morality plays in school to tell us how to think and behave.

And then you’d run home, turn on the television, and then you’d be stuck with yet another morality play.

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This article in the Washington Post is one of those things that reeks of that kind of childish indoctrination.

#MeToo bothers journalists because it exposed their immortality to the world.

And because it is a profession that puts more currency on narrative than reality, it is always trying to spin things into neat little packages, and this is an enormous disservice to people trying to improve their surroundings.

You win battles, you have setbacks, you keep fighting until you win the war. You do not have one victory, and then expect the people who defeated to now congratulate you for putting them in their place.

#MeToo is an army of sorts, and the battle is to go to work in peace, yet it is always being spun as some sort of “witch hunt”, which it never was.

It was a mass reaction to a problem Western society still has not dealt with adequately, if at all.

So you have a woman who created a list of men who abused women on the job, and it was leaked out and her identity exposed. She believes she was naive, but she wasn’t naive: she took on a fight that went on longer than it should have.

When you speak your mind out in public, you will get abused. It doesn’t matter if you expose a child molester, people who also molest children, their enablers, and those who got a pay check from said molester and now are out of a job will slag you in public because you tore down their façade.

If you expose that a so-called reality show is fake — people will do the same thing.

People abuse people in their own homes — their own children, parents, and spouses — so it is to be expected that they bluster and insult strangers.

It doesn’t mean that it should have been exposed.

There is always a trade-off: the problem is Western thought has been trained to believe you can squirt something on a dirty stain — and the stain will erase itself, and you can go back on the sofa and drink beer and watch television.

That’s journalistic narrative. 

Life is not about convenience — it is about pushing forward and understanding there will always be resistance — but you have to push forward, even when others try to push you back.

If life was wonderful, there would have been no #MeToo. It wasn’t as if people were bored and then decided to make themselves vulnerable and reveal they were powerless at work and scared. They confessed in order to make those problems go away.

It worked, but that was one battle — it was not the end of the war.

Except the Washington Post doesn’t comprehend what the movement was all about.

The column offers no reality and no context.

But journalism was never about either…

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